Monday, November 6, 2017

Annual Dental Benefits – Use It Or Lose It

It’s almost the end of the year again we know that your calendar is quickly filling up.
Having a limited time because of other commitments just take note that it might be worthwhile to add a dental appointment to your schedule.
Did you know that you may be throwing away hundreds of dollars? It’s true! Most dental insurances reset at the onset of the new year and any unused benefits will disappear. By using your dental insurance benefits before the new year starts, you could be saving yourself hundreds of dollars!
Some dental insurance plans run on a fiscal year but most run on a calendar year. If your dental insurance plan is on a calendar year, these are the 4 reasons you should definitely give us a call and make an appointment now.
1. Unused Benefits Get Wasted
Every dental insurance plan has a yearly maximum and this is the most money that the plan will pay for your dental treatment within one full year. While the amount varies among insurance companies, the yearly maximum usually renews each year on January 1st. These benefits do not roll over to the next year and must be used by December 31st. So, if you have unused benefits left for 2017, remember that by the 1st of January 2018 they will be forfeited and lost.
2. Take Advantage of Your Premiums
If you are paying your dental insurance premiums every month, then take advantage of them and use them to your benefit. If you do not use your benefits, your insurance company keeps it, and it will all be a waste. Even if you don’t need any dental treatment, it is still important to get regular dental cleanings to help prevent and detect any early signs of cavities, gum disease, oral cancer and other dental problems.
3. Your Annual Deductible Resets
Your dental insurance deductible is the amount of money that you must pay to your dentist out of pocket before your insurance company will pay for any dental services. This fee varies from one plan to another and like your yearly maximums, they don’t roll over to the next year. If you have used your insurance at all this year, you’ve probably paid some towards your deductible already. In fact, you may have already paid your deductible and what’s left if your coverage.
4. Dental Conditions Can Worsen
Many patients need dental treatment, whether it’s a professional cleaning of your teeth, or restorations to treat bad decay. By postponing a dental treatment, you are risking more extensive and expensive treatments in the future. Addressing dental issues now, rather than putting off treatment can prevent problems from getting worse, which could save you even more money compared to waiting. What may be a simple cavity now, could turn into a tooth loss later or root canal later.
So request an appointment today or calls us to schedule and use those benefits. Do not wait until late December to reserve an appointment with Dr. Eddie Faddis.  Treat your teeth with care now and they will thank you for it in the long run.

Call us and we can work with your insurance company to see what you still have available for benefits this year. You can reach our office at 801-785-8835.

Monday, September 4, 2017

Be Prepared For Dental Emergencies


INJURIES ALWAYS SEEM TO HAPPEN when we least expect them. Picture yourself at an outdoor gathering, having fun, when suddenly a crying child runs up to you, knocked-out tooth in hand. Would you know what to do?

Dental First Aid Saves Teeth

Knocking out or fracturing a tooth is especially distressing—just thinking about it can make you uncomfortable! But knowing what to do within the first hour after dental damage occurs can save the tooth. Here’s your plan of action:

1. Carefully recover the tooth.

Pick up the tooth by the crown, do not touch the root. If necessary, gently rinse the tooth in water or milk, but do not scrub or brush the root.

2. Don’t let the tooth dry out.

If possible, put the tooth back in the socket and hold it in place with fingers or by gently biting on gauze. If you can’t reimplant the tooth, keep it in milk (not water) or inside the cheek until you can find help.

3. Seek professional dental care immediately.

You’ll have the best chance of saving the tooth if you get to a dentist or emergency room within an hour.

Prevent Injuries Before They Happen

Accidents happen, but there are many steps you can take to prevent dental damage! These include:

~wearing a mouthguard for sports
~not chewing ice and other extremely hard foods
~using scissors to open packages, not your teeth

Teeth are strong, but they can only last a lifetime if you do your part to keep them safe and healthy!

No Matter What Happens, We’re Here For You

Part of what makes dental injury so traumatic is the thought that the damage could be permanent. We’re here to assure you that even if a tooth cannot be saved, we have the knowledge and tools to restore your smile! Should a dental emergency ever occur, see us as soon as possible.



Thanks for reading! We treasure the trust you place in our team as your lifelong dental health partners. Remember to protect your teeth!

*Image by Flickr user Melissa Wiese used under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 license. Image cropped and modified from original.

Monday, July 10, 2017

Managing Tooth Sensitivity

IF THERE’S ONE THING we can all agree on, it’s that nobody likes sensitive teeth! Tooth sensitivity can cause discomfort during daily tasks such as brushing, flossing, eating, drinking, and even breathing in a cold gush of air!

If you are experiencing tooth sensitivity, there are measures you can take to relieve pain and treat discomfort.

Start By Visiting Your Dentist

If you are concerned about sensitive teeth, seek a dental professional’s help first. Tooth sensitivity, while common, can also be a sign of something more serious. Your dentist can help identify what the underlying cause of your sensitivity is and prescribe the best treatment option for you and your smile! After an evaluation, your dentist might recommend:

Desensitizing toothpaste: This type of toothpaste is specially formulated to soothe the nerve endings in the tooth and reduce pain.
Bonding agent: This is the material used to stick tooth colored restorations to teeth. It can also be used to seal the dentin surface and protect sensitive areas from outside stimuli.
Fluoride: Your dentist may apply fluoride to sensitive areas. This strengthens tooth enamel and treats pain.
Limiting acidic foods and drinks: Carbonated beverages, citrus fruits, wine, yogurt, etc. are acidic and, when consumed frequently, can remove small amounts of tooth enamel over time. Drink acidic liquids with straws to avoid contact with teeth.

A Good Oral Hygiene Routine Can Help You Avoid Sensitivity

Proper brushing and flossing can prevent conditions such as gum disease which is known to cause gum recession. When gums recede, part of the tooth root is exposed, leading to sensitivity. Over-brushing or brushing too aggressively can also lead to receding gums and even enamel erosion—both of which cause sensitivity.

When Whitening Your Teeth, Consult With Your Dentist

Tooth sensitivity is a common side effect of teeth whitening. To avoid or diminish sensitivity after whitening, consider using a lower concentration of whitening product and reduce the amount of time the bleach is in contact with the teeth.

Always consult with your dentist before whitening as he or she can help determine the best treatment options for you. If you or someone you know has particularly sensitive teeth, there are additional steps we can take to help avoid and relieve the sensitivity caused by whitening.

We Can Help With Tooth Sensitivity

Although sensitivity is common, there are things we can do to help relieve and reduce the discomfort that it causes. No one should have to live with tooth pain. Call us or come in today so we can help you achieve a pain-free smile!

To our wonderful patients, we appreciate you!

*Image by Flickr user Dave Herholz used under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 license. Image cropped and modified from original
The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.

Monday, May 1, 2017

Mouthwash, is it necessary in dental health?

HAVE YOU EVER WONDERED if mouthwash is actually a necessary part of your dental hygiene routine? If you’d like to use mouthwash as a part of your daily oral care, it’s important to know what it is and what it does.

What Purpose Does Mouthwash Serve?

We learn at a very early age that daily brushing and flossing are necessary habits to clean our teeth and care for our gums. But you may begin to wonder: “What more can mouthwash do for me?”

Mouthwashes are used for more reasons than you may realize, some of those being:

~to freshen breath
~help prevent or control tooth decay
~reduce plaque
~prevent or reduce gingivitis (the early stage of gum disease)
~reduce the speed that tartar (hardened plaque) forms on the teeth

We’re Here To Help You Improve Your Oral Health Care Routine!

One of the most important things to remember is that rinsing your mouth with mouthwash does not replace daily brushing and flossing! Mouthwash is meant to act as an aid to brushing and flossing, helping to freshen breath and fight bacteria. We recommend using an alcohol free and anti-bacterial rinse.  If you have any more questions about mouthwash, let us know!

Thank you for your trust in our practice!

*Image by jchwhite used under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 license. Image cropped and modified from original.

The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.



Monday, April 3, 2017

The Link Between Osteoporosis And Gum Disease

WHAT DO OSTEOPOROSIS and gum disease have in common? Bone loss! For anyone with gum disease, osteoporosis, or both… it’s important to know about the correlation between these two conditions.

How Does Gum Disease Cause Bone Loss?

Are you surprised to hear that gum disease can contribute to bone loss? The first stage of gum disease, gingivitis, rarely affects bone structure. But if it progresses to advanced periodontitis, then the infection spreads beneath the teeth to destroy connective gum tissue AND supportive structure in your jaw.

Those With Osteoporosis May Have 85% Greater Periodontitis Risk

A recent study showed an alarmingly high correlation between low bone density and gum disease risk. Bone density was measured using a FRAX score (fracture risk assessment tool). Even disregarding common risk factors like age, smoking, or diabetes, it was shown that patients with osteoporosis have an 85% greater likelihood of periodontal disease.

More research is needed to find the reason for this correlation. However, one factor is important to note: advanced gum disease degrades bone mass in the jaw. For those with already-low bone mass, thanks to osteoporosis, the risk is even greater. Gum disease can very quickly cause a lot of damage.

We’re Looking Out For Your Whole-Body Health

So, if you have gum disease, along with other possible risk factors for osteoporosis, don’t be surprised if we ask you the last time you had a checkup with your doctor. After looking at a dental x-ray, we may recommend that you have your bone health assessed.

In the meantime, take good care of your teeth. Gum disease can be worrying, but it’s preventable with good personal care habits and frequent visits with our team.

The relationship between osteoporosis and gum disease is just one example of the mouth-body health connection. The more we learn, the more we see that what happens in your mouth doesn’t just stay in your mouth. Dental health has an effect on your entire body.

Let us know if you have any questions about your dental health. We’re honored to be your partners in oral health care.

*Image by Flickr user Erin Borrini used under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 license. Image cropped and modified from original.

Monday, March 6, 2017

Don’t Let Dental Anxiety Keep You From A Healthy Smile

HAS IT BEEN A WHILE since you visited the dentist? Does anxiety or worry about discomfort account for your absence? If fear is preventing you from enjoying the health benefits of regular dental appointments, here’s our plea: give us a chance to change your mind!

Let Us Help You Stop The Cycle

Far too many of us get caught in a terrible cycle. Out of fear, we procrastinate dental visits until tooth pain or discomfort is severe. That procrastination results in tooth decay or gum disease. Faced with the prospect of restorative treatment, we once again avoid care, which leads to further decay and disease.

Wouldn’t it be nice to have simple, easy checkups—and dental health peace of mind after each visit?

We’ve worked successfully to restore the health of many anxious patients, and we can help you too!

At Our Practice, We Prioritize Your Comfort

We offer Nitrous Oxide and IV Sedation for your appointments that can be a great option for anxiety. We also have Netflix to watch or an I-Pod loaded with a variety of music to listen to during your appointment that are tools that help calm nerves.

Try Transferring Your Anxiety Somewhere Else!


Hey, it could help! If worrying about things is just part of your nature, try taking all that worrying and transferring it to things that make more sense to worry about. Use this video as practice.

Find Your Happy Place At Our Dental Office

We know it may sound too simple to be true, but we believe that you should enjoy your visits with us! We’ll work with you and plan a way to make you comfortable with your dental care. Give us a call, or share this message with a friend.

Thanks for trusting our practice with your dental needs.

*Image by Flickr user Holly Lay used under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 license. Image cropped and modified from original.




Monday, February 6, 2017

Protect Your Child From Baby Bottle Tooth Decay

DO YOU EVER put your baby to bed with a bottle? It may seem harmless. But if the bottle is full of milk or juice, it may begin to erode their teeth.

Acid-Producing Bacteria Cause Baby Bottle Tooth Decay

Baby bottles full of milk or juice are also full of sugars that combine with bacteria to produce acids. When a baby drifts off with a bottle still in his or her mouth, the fluid pools around teeth and slowly erodes the enamel throughout the night.

The result can be painful tooth decay—also known as caries—and/or the need for crowns or extractions. In addition, since children’s teeth are still coming in they’re more susceptible to decay beneath the gum line. This decay can become so severe that delicate surgery under a general anesthetic is sometimes required to remedy the problem.

Protect Your Child’s Teeth From The Start

Give your child’s teeth the best protection you can, from the start! Dental health habits should begin before your child even grows their full set of baby teeth.

Baby teeth may be temporary, but they’re essential for your child’s health and development. They help your child eat and learn to speak. They also play an important role in guiding permanent teeth as they grow in properly.

We’re Here To Help

We’re here to help you help your child during this important time of life. If you have any questions about your child’s dental health, please send them our way. You can give us a call or reach out to us on Facebook! We’re excited to join forces to make sure your child has excellent oral health.



We appreciate your trust in our practice!

*Image by Flickr user Zhao ! used under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 license. Image cropped and modified from original.